History
Icon-add-to-playlist Icon-download Icon-drawer-up
Share this ... ×
...
By ...
Embed:
Copy
Rss
For Your Listening Pleasure
Starting September 1st, official home of "Project 366"
Category: Music
Location: Ottawa, ON
Followers (12)
Currently following. Unfollow
Image_nophoto Picture?width=25&height=25 Picture?width=25&height=25 Image_nophoto Image_nophoto Picture?width=25&height=25 Image_nophoto Image_nophoto Image_nophoto 25x25_5630592 Image_nophoto Image_nophoto
100x100_4501888


by Pierre
x
take it with you
Iphone5s_trans go mobile with Podomatic's new iPhone app.
don't have an iPhone? no problem »
x
loading results... Loader
loading results... Loader
x
No results found.
July 12, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"Felix Mendelssohn: Symphonies no. 1 & 5" The grandson of the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Felix Mendelssohn was born into a prominent Jewish family. Although initially he was raised without religion, he was later baptized as a Reformed Christian. Althugh one would expect Mendelssohn to have had a "mixed allegiance" to the Jewish and Christian faiths, it is the latter that had Mendelssohn's devotion. During 1829 and 1830 Mendelssohn wrote his Symphony No. 5, known as the Reformation. It celebrated the 300th anniversary of the Lutheran Church. Mendelssohn remained dissatisfied with the work and did not allow publication of the score. It was not published until 1868, 21 years after the composer's death. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/pcast179

July 11, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"Mendelssohn & Mahler Symphonies no. 4" Mendelssohn's Fourth symphony results from Mendelssohn's European travels in the late 1820's, which also gave us his Scottish Symphony. Completed in Berlin, the symphony was first performed in London in 1833 and - from what we can read - didn't completely please Mendelssohn. He planned to do complete rewrites of several of its movements but - thank Goodness - he never got around to it! Mahler's early symphonies all find their inspiration from the many texts of Des Knaben Wunderhorn. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/pcast156

July 10, 2020 12:00 AM PDT

For our throwback montage this week, I turn to our old series "The Musical Passport" for a trip to Scandinavia and works by four native sons: Wiren, Nielsen, Grieg and Sibelius (including his violin concerto) Read our bfresh take on July 10 @ http://itywltmt.blogspot.ca/, details @ https://archive.org/details/pcast120-Playlist (ITYWLTMT Podcast # 120 - 30 Aug 2013)

July 10, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"Cantelli Conducts Tchaikovsky (Part 2)" Guido Cantelli had a stellar but brief career as a conductor, championed by Toscanini who had begun looking for a younger associate to keep the NBC Symphony Orchestra (created for him in 1938) on course during his absences. He arranged for the young conductor's immediate NBC debut on January 15, 1949. Afterwards, Time magazine featured a profile likening him physically to Frank Sinatra, but musically to Arturo Toscanini. Until NBC disbanded the orchestra in 1954, Cantelli conducted there annually, beginning with four but expanding to eight programs. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/PeterIlijcTchaikovskyTheLastThreeSymphonies [First Time on our Podcasting Channel]

July 09, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"Cantelli Conducts Tchaikovsky (Part 1)" Guido Cantelli had a stellar but brief career as a conductor, championed by Toscanini who had begun looking for a younger associate to keep the NBC Symphony Orchestra (created for him in 1938) on course during his absences. He arranged for the young conductor's immediate NBC debut on January 15, 1949. Afterwards, Time magazine featured a profile likening him physically to Frank Sinatra, but musically to Arturo Toscanini. Until NBC disbanded the orchestra in 1954, Cantelli conducted there annually, beginning with four but expanding to eight programs. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/PeterIlijcTchaikovskyTheLastThreeSymphonies [First Time on our Podcasting Channel]

July 08, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"A Second or Two" Today's montage looks at "second" works, or "number twos" from Bach to Buczynski.,Featured are a couple of "second rhapsodies". Both Debussy and Gershwin had their "first rhapsodies" featured last year. Debussy's first rhapsody (for clarinet) was followed later by a second, this time for saxophone. The work, originally set for saxophone and piano, was later set for orchestra at first by Debussy himself, and finished in 1919 by Roger Ducasse. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/Pcast090

July 07, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"Mahler in Boston" Alsatian conductor Charles Munch (who was Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra from 1949 to 1963) is often thought of as a master of French music – which he undoubtedly was – but we must not forget that he worked his way through the ranks as a violinist and later as concertmaster of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra under Wilhelm Furtwängler and Bruno Walter (1926 to 1933). It should not be a surprise that Munch is no slouch when it comes to the German repertoire… Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/pcast290

July 06, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"Karajan Conducts Tchaikovsky" Herbert von Karajan can be trusted with more than just the great German composers. Karajan’s repertoire of predilection is German post-classical and romantic, but he also excels in late romantic Italian opera (Verdi), Scandinavian (Sibelius) and Russian/Soviet repertoire (Prokofiev, Shostakovich and Tchaikovsky). Karajan was unquestionably a great Tchaikovsky conductor. Although he recorded the last three symphonies many times, he did not turn to the first three until the end of the 1970s, and then proved an outstanding advocate. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/pcast305

July 05, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"This & That" You like two-part titles? I cover the bases, going from one of the many Toccatas and Fugues for organ by J.-S. Bach, French composers Berlioz and Saint-Saëns, Rëverie et caprice and Introduction et Rondo Capriccioso, Chopin's breath taking Andante spianato and grande polonaise brillante. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/ThisThat_522

July 04, 2020 07:00 AM PDT

"America" America is synonymous with migration - save for the people from the First Nations, everybody (or their ancestors) have come from elsewhere. Many of today's musical selections are indicative of travel to America, or of people that have elected to live in America. Details at our archive page @ https://archive.org/details/Pcast116

loading more... Loader
 
x

take it with you


Iphone_trans Listening to podcasts on your mobile devices is extremely convenient -- and it's what makes the podcasting medium so powerful.

You can take your favorite shows and mixes with you anywhere, but to do so requires some quick and simple steps.

Let's walk you through that process together.
step 1:


Click the "Subscribe With iTunes" link in the page's sidebar:

Subscribe_with_itunes

This will require that you have the iTunes software on your computer.

(You can download iTunes here.)
step 2:
Itunes_ss

Now that you've subscribed to the podcast on iTunes, the feed will display in your "Podcasts" section on the left navigation bar.

Click there and you'll see the show displayed in the iTunes browser.

You can "get all" to download all available episodes or just individual episodes.
step 3:


Plug your mobile device (iPhone, iPad, iPod) into your computer with the Dock Connector cable, and click the device in iTunes's left navigation bar.

Itunes_ss2

Once you have your device highlighted, click "Podcasts" in the top navigation bar and sync the podcasts you want on your device. Click "apply" and the episodes you have downloaded on your iTunes software will sync with your device.
that's it!

The beauty of this process is that now, every new episode of your subscribed podcasts will automatically sync to your device every time you plug it in and open iTunes. You can now take your favorite shows with you everywhere you go.

Enjoy!
done!
x

share this podcast


Email a friend about this podcast
x

subscribe to this podcast

Rss-icon RSS
Itunes-icon iTunes